Welcome to my homeschool blog, which offers insights into loving learning, loving your family, loving history, loving homeschooling, and enjoying your life! With your cup of coffee in hand, take a break to laugh with me, to have your heart refreshed, to be reminded of how cool your kids really are, and to consider the amazing adventure of being a homeschool mom. AND, if you are interested in the History Revealed curriculum, be sure to check out my Teaching Tips!

Let kids MOVE!

Let kids MOVE!

What on earth do we do with those kids who seem to constantly fidget and bounce and doodle and roll and jump and run and dance? Prepare yourself, because this might seem simplistic. The answer to the question of dealing with kids who won’t sit still is: Let Them Move!!

Goodness, why didn’t I think of that?

It took years of having a tree-climbing, hall-running, constantly-in-motion child before I finally realized that trying to force him into the sit-down-and-don’t-move-while-you-study mold was utterly worthless. He didn’t learn, we didn’t enjoy our efforts, and I was weary of trying to hold back the irrepressible energy of youth.

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Learning Like a Buffalo, Part Two

Learning Like a Buffalo, Part Two

Gazing at the IMMENSE hole of a buffalo jump in Beulah, Wyoming (as described in the previous post), I suddenly saw a relationship between making it easy to process buffalo for winter and making it easy for kids to learn.

To explain, let me start with a few questions:

Do you remember when you were in school?

      • Were you sometimes bored?
      • Were you uninterested in what had to be memorized?
      • Did it seem that school work was disconnected from "real life"?
      • Would you ask your teacher, "Why do I have to do this?"

If so, you are not alone.

For me, school often felt like being sentenced to twelve years—with no chance of parole! Occasionally, there would be a flash of interest, an insightful teacher, a momentary experience of discovery, but that was certainly not the norm. Mostly, we were shuffled from one class to another, regardless of interest, until graduation.

You may be one of the lucky few who do not relate to this, but thousands upon thousands of homeschooling parents have agreed in workshops that this was their experience.

When we try to teach our own children at home, these school-days experiences can come back to haunt us. Here sit our precious offspring, yawning, their eyes glazed over, and asking, "Mommy, do we HAVE to do this?" Ouch! We understand exactly what they mean, but we don't know how to make their experience different from ours.

Excited to learn!Buffalo Jumps in Learning

In contrast to the yawning, glazed-eye student, have your children ever been totally self-motivated to learn about something? Whether baseball, dead bugs, piano, or how to make fried ice cream, they were eager, rarin' to go, and couldn't wait to know!

That, my friends, is a Buffalo Jump. Your student's natural hunger to discover and learn is one of the most powerful forces that you will ever find! The trick is to recognize it when it is happening (or to offer opportunities for it to happen), and then allow the full "weight" of their curiosity to propel them deep into whatever they are learning.

Here's an example:

Twenty-two years ago, after we had moved from the West Coast to South Dakota, my nine-year old son asked me, "Mom, why do steel ships float?"

Nowadays, this would be a no-brainer. An iPhone, a quick Google search, and an answer. But not in 1992.

Why do steel ships float?With out a single steel ship in sight, I was sunk.

But then, I did what homeschoolers used to do all the time. "I don't know the answer to your great question, Michael, but I know where we can go to find out!"

And, with great expectations, we sailed off to the library. When the librarian was asked, "Excuse me, do you know why steel ships float?", she looked around in dismay. Evidently, that question was not real common in South Dakota.

"Hmmm... Try this book." It was a college level book on boat building, and way beyond me. I slunk out of the library, kids in tow, still clueless.

Never one to give up, my son kept asking the question: "Why do steel ships float?"

We looked through other books at home. We looked high, we looked low. We looked through every book we thought might have the answer. Still clueless.

It got so we were asking everyone we met, "Excuse me, but do you know why...?"

After two weeks of searching, late one night I remembered a box of books in the closet. "Mmmm. I wonder..." I sprang from the bed to the box, found a book on how things work by Reader's Digest, and quickly turned to the index. Incredibly, I saw this listing, "Why steel ships float". EUREKA! Our answer was at hand.

As the whole family learned about the principle of buoyancy, about surface tension, and about the ancient scientist/mathematician/inventor Archimedes, we thought up several creative ideas for experiments with lead fishing weights. We pounded and dropped and observed and recorded. By the time it was done, Michael's curiosity about why steel ships float had motivated the whole family to jump into exploring with him, learning things beyond our ken and certainly beyond our lesson book!

Opportunities Abound!

Many, many dinner table discussions have resulted in perusing encyclopedias, requesting library books, searching internet listings, and questioning experts. Questions have come up during mathematics that were totally off the point but worth pursuing nonetheless. Ideas have been generated during car rides that require lots of thinking and discussing. There have been on-the-spot opportunities to learn while having an x-ray (How can you tell if my finger is broken?); while eating at a Chinese restaurant (What was your home like in China?); while visiting a cattle ranch (Where did those brands come from?).

These moments, when someone wonders, "why?" or, "when?" or, "how?" or, "who?" or, "what if," are the Buffalo Jumps. They present the perfect opportunities to use the tremendous force of natural curiosity to propel a student into interesting, meaningful learning.

BuffaloJust as the buffalo jumps were used as an effective, efficient means of procuring meat for the tribe, so are the buffalo jumps of learning a very effective, efficient means of getting knowledge into a child. Rather than the few inches of refuse found in normal archaeological sites, the buffalo jump in Wyoming provided archaeologists with more than twenty feet of "stuff"! In the same way, learning that is motivated by a hunger to know—where the student rushes headlong into it—is far more productive; it leaves far more evidence of knowledge acquired than the normal method of "read the chapter and answer the questions in the back."

"Okay, okay. But will our children, on their own, EVER fall into one of these educational buffalo jumps?"

Motivating Them

Good question! The buffalo, ambling along on their own, wouldn't have just fallen in. The Plains tribes skillfully used their knowledge. They knew where the buffalo were and the location of the jump. All they needed was to move the herd in that general direction, and at the appropriate moment, "motivate" them! The natural law of gravity took care of the rest.

So, in buffalo jumps of learning, the parent is the one who knows where their students are in skill level, in experience, and in ability. A parent, spying out the land, will also be aware of what sorts of things really interest their children, whether it has to do with inventions, or biographies, or sports, or crafts, or hands-on experiments, or drama, or whatever it might be. What the parent can do is to begin moving the students toward a possible area of interest, and, at the appropriate moment, motivate some excitement into that area (in other words, activate their natural curiosity.)

Here are some suggestions:

  •  find a fantastic book in the library and read a few chapters out loud (like Carry On, Mr. Bowditch);
  •  watch a YouTube video which shows how cathedrals were built in the Middle Ages (like "Cathedral" by David Macaulay);
  •  take a field trip to see a sculptor sculpting;
  •  visit a veteran who fought in a war;
  •  go to a symphony performance of Peter and the Wolf;
    and much, much more.

These motivating moments, that you help provide, will get those children stampeding right smack into real learning! Then all you have to do is stand by, ready to assist.

That, dear friends, is learning like a buffalo!

Remember, stay relational.

Diana


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Learning like a Buffalo

Learning like a Buffalo

Many years ago, while living in the Black Hills of South Dakota, Bill and I decided one afternoon that it was time to take time. Bidding our teens a fond adieu, we headed off to parts unknown for the evening. Remembering the injunction, "Go West, Young Man, Go West!", we turned toward Wyoming, which teems with wildlife and scenery in nearly every nook and cranny.

We took the scenic route from Spearfish, South Dakota to Beulah, Wyoming (just across the border), and continued along the deserted blacktop. The weather that summer evening was very unusual for the high plains. Rather than hot, sunny, and nary a cloud in the sky (think "Home on the Range"), it was cool, misty and laden with atmosphere. It had a wonderful ambience, a sort of mist-hung backdrop for our moment of solitude.

Bill was looking for a certain site he had noticed from previous journeys down the freeway. A sign had indicated there was a "buffalo jump"—something used for several centuries by Native American tribes—which seemed like a good place to visit. We found a small marker on the side of the road which indicated we had arrived, though there was certainly nothing yet to see.

I guess that's the deal with buffalo jumps. One minute you're running along over the plains, and the next, you fall—plop—into the hole. If it were obvious, the buffalo would have noticed.

Signs warned that we were to approach at our own risk, that rattlesnakes were a hazard, and to stay on the dirt path. We saw pictures of archaeological digs previously completed at the site where twenty feet of buffalo bones had accumulated over the six hundred years of use. Though we could still see nothing unusual, the signs were promising bigger and better things to come.

We walked a dozen yards up the path (with my rattlesnake antennae well extended), and then, suddenly, the ground stopped. There was a HUGE hole in the ground, about one hundred feet deep and two hundred feet in diameter. This was a serious buffalo jump!

At the bottom of the Vore Buffalo JumpThe utter immensity of this hole in the ground, and the unexpectedness of it on the continuous plains, provided an amazing opportunity for the Plains tribes. In preparation for their winter food supply, they would position men at the edges of the jump and bowmen around the inside of the hole. Then a group would turn a herd of buffalo toward the jump and, at the last minute, frighten them into stampeding. Once a buffalo was moving fast and in the right direction, gravity took over. Many of the buffalo died as a result of the fall. Others died from falling neighbors. And the few who didn't die naturally were helped along by arrows from the men on the sides of the hole.

The archaeological digs have shown that the people who used this jump were able to process a lot of meat in a very short time. It was both a successful and relatively easy procedure, since they used the  immense hole in the ground—along with gravity—to help them.

Now, you may be asking, "Just what do a buffalo jump and homeschooling have in common?"

There's a GREAT answer to that question. And I'll share it with you next time.

To be continued . . .


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Kids are NOT alike!

Kids are NOT alike!

When my children were 10, 8 and 6, a friend wrangled an invitation for us to join her at a farm for a homeschool science field trip:  watching a butcher cut up a cow.  It was supposed to be a practical view of—as well as a fascinating glimpse into—the insides of a recently living creature.

My friend, who was of a scientific bent (she had already dissected a cow’s eyeball at the kitchen table with her kids), was a fabulous salesman for this event.

“Diana, your kids will love this!  It’s so cool to see things in person rather than just in pictures.  Several homeschooling families will be there, it’s going to be GREAT!!”

And you know, one of my kids did love it.  (That was the one who would one day do a stint as a hospital corpsman in the Navy.)  He was spellbound as he stood close to the butcher, happily holding every thing handed to him, regardless of how gooey.

On the other hand, one of my kids hated it.  (That was the one who would one day faint at the clinic when, as a college student, he was just trying to give blood.)  He took one brief look at what was happening to that cow, and then fled to the safe haven of our car.

Though I hadn’t realized it so concretely until that moment, what is one person’s delight may be another person’s nightmare—and vice versa!  We need to not only be aware of this, we need to honor these differences.  Why?  Because they were hardwired into our children by One who created them for His plans and purposes.

Allow for—and respect—the individuality of each one in your family.  That means, in case you missed it, not every child has to dissect the eyeball of a cow.  But then, not every child has to be kept at home when the cow is butchered. . .  Pay attention to what is good for your individual kids.  Relationally speaking, it’s the wisest thing you’ll ever do!

For more on the way our kids are wired to learn, check this out:

WatchVideoYellowButton-2

 

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How God Made You—and Your Kids!—Smart: Spatial Intelligence

Rod & Alexis' Dining RoomI used to live next door to an amazing artist, Alexis Wilson Russell, a vibrant painter and committed Christian. Her Cherokee husband (now deceased), was a preacher of the Gospel of Jesus, and, together, they had ministered in many nations of the world—before ending up as my neighbors! Here is a photo of their tiny dining room, displaying an artist's love of color, texture, and visual interest.

White Buffalo WomanMany years ago, we accompanied Alexis and Rod to a Native American gathering in South Dakota, which to my wondering eyes was a brilliant tapestry of culture, color and sound. As we were leaving, Alexis spotted a Native woman's spectacular regalia, and ran to ask permission to take a photo in order to paint it. I remember watching Alexis paint this glorious painting, and yet, as an absolute novice when it comes to all things artistic, I still have no idea how she was able to recreate this. Here is the final result—a detailed, vibrant depiction of beauty, color and Native culture that still takes my breath away.

How can anyone do this??

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