Welcome to my homeschool blog, which offers insights into loving learning, loving your family, loving history, loving homeschooling, and enjoying your life! With your cup of coffee in hand, take a break to laugh with me, to have your heart refreshed, to be reminded of how cool your kids really are, and to consider the amazing adventure of being a homeschool mom. AND, if you are interested in the History Revealed curriculum, be sure to check out my Teaching Tips!

Teaching Tip 5—Different Tastes

If you were only allowed one kind of taste in your cooking, which one would it be?

Categories of Taste

You’ve probably taught your kids about the four basic taste categories in food—sweet, sour, salt, and bitter.  (Note: There is a fifth and sixth category, too—umami and piquant— but kids may not understand these flavors as easily.)

If there were only one?

Now, with all those flavors floating through your mind, let me ask you a bizarre question:  What one flavor would you serve your kids day-in and day-out? Really, which ONE would you choose?

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Humor at Home

Humor at Home

Do you remember the saying,

"Give me a fish and I'll eat for a day, teach me to fish and I'll eat for a lifetime"?  

It is as true for laughter as it is for seafood!

"Tell me a joke, and I'll laugh for a minute.

Teach me good humor, and I'll laugh for a lifetime."

This actually became one of my parenting goals: to teach my kids good humor in the context and safety of home. In the process of learning how to do this, some basic principles began to emerge. I call them my 10 Rules & Regs for Humor.  (This quick list is excerpted from one of the most popular workshops I ever presented, The Hilarious Homeschool.)

1) Don't gain a laugh at someone else's expense—If it makes fun of someone else, don't do it.

2) Snide remarks, put-downs, and demeaning sarcasm  are NOT allowed—Speak the truth in LOVE.

3) Ethnic jokes CAN be, "We belong, they don't!"—Making fun of other cultures and people-groups devalues those made in God's image.

4) Crude jokes are in bad taste—Adults need to be the ones who set the standard for wholesome humor.

Teach them WHY it is funny5) Puns are FOUNDATIONAL—Start with a basic "Knock, Knock" joke, and teach kids why it is funny.

6) Memorize a few good jokes—Give your kids success through tried-and-true laughter makers!

7) Play with language—Try traditional ways, like limericks or "spoonerisms."

8) Home must be safe—Make sure your entire family plays by these rules: demeaning, disrespect, and making fun of others is NOT ALLOWED.

9) Practice makes funny—Take time and make the effort to play with humor. . .Put it on your calendar and in your schedule!

10) Good humor at home uses wisdom—"Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things." Philippians 4:8

According to Proverbs 17:22, "A cheerful heart is good medicine. . ."  And, believe me, you need this kind of prescription!

Remember, laughter is one of the best ways to cheer up a home, especially one filled with fun-loving kids!!

For more explanation of these ten rules and regs, along with some of the funniest stories from my homeschool adventures, check out my Hilarious Homeschool Workshop on CD.

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Teaching Tip 4 — Learning Styles

If you think back to your days in a classroom, can you remember the kid that was always fidgeting? And, what about the one who was always talking? You probably noticed the studious types who knew every answer in English, history or science class, and the gregarious types who knew every person in school. In P.E., some kids could run laps without breaking a sweat, while others could barely make it once around the track. In art or music, some made it look easy while the rest tried to not look stupid. There were labels—from top student to teacher’s pet to ADD to daydreamer to troublemaker—whether positive or negative, given by teachers and other students. Do you remember?

Why do some students thrive when they sit at a desk with a book and an assignment, while others struggle? And, more importantly, why do we consider the former “smart” and the others not? Why do we find some easy to teach—dream students—while others frustrate us? These questions are critical to answer because we want ALL of our kids to thrive in their learning experience.

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Meeting another Von Trapp!

Meeting a von Trapp!

Previously, I blogged about my unexpected introduction to Rosemarie, the eldest daughter born to Captain and Maria von Trapp. You can read it here. But, surprisingly, that is not my only experience meeting the von Trapp's.

At a homeschool convention a few years ago, I was presenting History Via the Scenic Route, a workshop about making history come to life using music, geography, science, literature, and more. . . The room was packed out, but, in the midst of all the different faces, I kept noticing this lovely, elderly woman in the back. There was something about her that was striking, and I remember thinking at the time, "She looks like such an interesting woman. . .I wish I could meet her!"

My next presentation would begin only fifteen minutes after History Via the Scenic Route ended, and, because it was in a different room, I had to hurry to get my computer and notes packed up and out the door. As is common, though, lots of folks had questions about the workshop. (Side note: it is not EASY to make sense when you are scrambling!!)

As I was frantically packing the last cord, I heard a warm and cultured voice say, "Oh, you are not leaving yet, are you? I wanted to share something with you!"

I looked up, and there was that charming woman I had noticed earlier. She had such an engaging smile, and I was delighted that she wanted to talk with me—but there was no time. So I asked, "Would you mind chatting as we walk to my next room, as I only have a few minutes to set up for the next workshop?" She graciously complied, and, with her husband, strolled down the hall with me, sharing stories of some of the beautiful things she had seen in Europe—stories that, based on my lecture, she thought I would enjoy.

She had such an engaging smileJust as we got to my next presentation room, as I prepared to reluctantly say goodbye to this marvelous conversationalist, she said, "I have one more thing I would like to tell you, but I am going to whisper it in your ear." This was endearing, and I assumed it was something of an earlier generation's manner.

Imagine my utter surprise when she whispered, "I am one of the von Trapp children. You must not tell anyone here, as there are always publicity hounds in every crowd."

I looked at her with astonishment and delight!

"Oh!!! I met your sister several years ago in Florida!! She was with Bill Anderson, and they came to our hotel room for dinner, stories and singing with my family!!!"

It was HER turn to be astonished. But, yes, she remembered having heard about that meeting a decade prior.

Huge smiles all around. So many things to share, no time left. . .Then, with a quick hug and a gratefully amazed heart, I bid adieu to a second daughter of Captain and Maria von Trapp!!!

Thought you would enjoy that story. . . I cherish the memory!!!

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Let kids MOVE!

What on earth do we do with those kids who seem to constantly fidget and bounce and doodle and roll and jump and run and dance? Prepare yourself, because this might seem simplistic. The answer to the question of dealing with kids who won’t sit still is: Let Them Move!!

Goodness, why didn’t I think of that?

It took years of having a tree-climbing, hall-running, constantly-in-motion child before I finally realized that trying to force him into the sit-down-and-don’t-move-while-you-study mold was utterly worthless. He didn’t learn, we didn’t enjoy our efforts, and I was weary of trying to hold back the irrepressible energy of youth.

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